The US Supreme Court issued stays Dec. 4 on two preliminary injunctions related to the Trump Administration’s third travel ban issued Sept. 24.

The court’s orders effectively allow enforcement of the ban on individuals from Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen—countries the US government had deemed uncooperative with stringent US entry security requirements announced in July—to move forward.

Shortly before the new ban was set to take effect Oct. 18, federal district courts in Hawaii and Maryland granted preliminary injunctions against most of the elements of the new version of the ban, blocking its enforcement.

The Maryland court’s preliminary injunction against the ban was filed Oct. 17 on behalf of an international refugee assistance group. The Hawaii court’s preliminary injunction, also issued Oct. 17, blocked implementation of the ban on residents of the six countries largely based on the interpretation that the ban was religiously motivated, referencing presidential candidate Donald Trump’s comments on banning Muslim immigration to the US.

The Trump Administration appealed both of the lower courts’ rulings.

In its orders released Dec. 4, the Supreme Court said its stay of the preliminary injunctions in both cases is “pending disposition of the Government’s appeal [in the respective Appeals Courts circuits] … and disposition of the Government’s petition for a writ of certiorari, if such a writ is sought. If a writ of certiorari is sought and the Court denies the petition, this order shall terminate automatically. If the Court grants the petition for a writ of certiorari, this order shall terminate when the Court enters its judgment.”

The court emphasized a decision on the cases by their respective Courts of Appeals is expected “with appropriate dispatch.”

Mark Nensel mark.nensel@penton.com